Corning Museum of Glass
Glass art, history, science, and design.
Corning Museum of Glass
Piano board i like to play all night, Anna Mikesova, Bothell, Washington, 2002. Published in New Glass Review 24 (via Piano board i like to play all night long | Corning Museum of Glass)
#Lalique of the Week
This ashtray is on view in the exhibition René Lalique: Enchanted by Glass
www.cmog.org/lalique
Statuette de la fontaine (Fountain statuette), Combs-la-Ville or Wingen-sur-Moder, France, designed 1925. 2011.3.471, gift of Elaine and Stanford Steppa.
http://ift.tt/Xwxt7Z #glass #artdeco #artnouveau http://ift.tt/1t7rDGA
Lightning Jar with Lid, possibly Hazel-Atlas Glass Company; possibly Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, West Virginia, 1882-1900. 52.4.226. (via Lightning Jar with Lid | Corning Museum of Glass)
Wool blankets keep guests warm at Hot Glass Show on Celebrity Cruises outside of Juneau, Alaska. http://ift.tt/1maILtW
Bottle, Roman Empire (if Roman); Western Europe (if Frankish), 300-575. 54.1.97.  (via Bottle | Corning Museum of Glass)
ZoomInfo
“To me, exploration is primary,” says Albert Paley. “New materials open up new possibilities.”
The Corning Museum of Glass is collaborating with Corning Incorporated to provide a new Specialty Glass Residency, and the first artist selected for this unique collaboration is American sculptor Albert Paley.
Paley, who is best known for his large-scale works in metal, has chosen to work with two Corning glasses. In August, he began exploring furnace-working and casting of Corning Code 7056, a borosilicate glass that was engineered to bond tightly to a metal alloy called Kovar. Corning 7056 is used industrially in special electronic circuit packages that need the durability of the metal, and the transparency of glass, with a perfect, air-tight seal between the two. Over the course of the year-long residency, Paley will also investigate high-purity fused silica (HPFS). HPFS can be aggressively shaped and joined with a torch, similar to how Paley works metal.
(Read the full article: Specialty Glass Residency: New Materials Open Up New Possibilities)
“To me, exploration is primary,” says Albert Paley. “New materials open up new possibilities.”
The Corning Museum of Glass is collaborating with Corning Incorporated to provide a new Specialty Glass Residency, and the first artist selected for this unique collaboration is American sculptor Albert Paley.
Paley, who is best known for his large-scale works in metal, has chosen to work with two Corning glasses. In August, he began exploring furnace-working and casting of Corning Code 7056, a borosilicate glass that was engineered to bond tightly to a metal alloy called Kovar. Corning 7056 is used industrially in special electronic circuit packages that need the durability of the metal, and the transparency of glass, with a perfect, air-tight seal between the two. Over the course of the year-long residency, Paley will also investigate high-purity fused silica (HPFS). HPFS can be aggressively shaped and joined with a torch, similar to how Paley works metal.
(Read the full article: Specialty Glass Residency: New Materials Open Up New Possibilities)
“To me, exploration is primary,” says Albert Paley. “New materials open up new possibilities.”
The Corning Museum of Glass is collaborating with Corning Incorporated to provide a new Specialty Glass Residency, and the first artist selected for this unique collaboration is American sculptor Albert Paley.
Paley, who is best known for his large-scale works in metal, has chosen to work with two Corning glasses. In August, he began exploring furnace-working and casting of Corning Code 7056, a borosilicate glass that was engineered to bond tightly to a metal alloy called Kovar. Corning 7056 is used industrially in special electronic circuit packages that need the durability of the metal, and the transparency of glass, with a perfect, air-tight seal between the two. Over the course of the year-long residency, Paley will also investigate high-purity fused silica (HPFS). HPFS can be aggressively shaped and joined with a torch, similar to how Paley works metal.
(Read the full article: Specialty Glass Residency: New Materials Open Up New Possibilities)
“To me, exploration is primary,” says Albert Paley. “New materials open up new possibilities.”
The Corning Museum of Glass is collaborating with Corning Incorporated to provide a new Specialty Glass Residency, and the first artist selected for this unique collaboration is American sculptor Albert Paley.
Paley, who is best known for his large-scale works in metal, has chosen to work with two Corning glasses. In August, he began exploring furnace-working and casting of Corning Code 7056, a borosilicate glass that was engineered to bond tightly to a metal alloy called Kovar. Corning 7056 is used industrially in special electronic circuit packages that need the durability of the metal, and the transparency of glass, with a perfect, air-tight seal between the two. Over the course of the year-long residency, Paley will also investigate high-purity fused silica (HPFS). HPFS can be aggressively shaped and joined with a torch, similar to how Paley works metal.
(Read the full article: Specialty Glass Residency: New Materials Open Up New Possibilities)
Goblet, Germany, 1850-1899. 56.3.92. (via Goblet | Corning Museum of Glass)
design-is-fine:

Francis Bedford, illustration of Venetian Glass, 1858. Lithography. From Art treasures of the United Kingdom. Day & Son Lith’rs to the Queen. Via NYPL
"Murano, where most of Venice’s glassmakers migrated to, “…held a monopoly on quality glassmaking for centuries, developing or refining many technologies including crystalline glass, enameled glass, glass with threads of gold, multicoloured glass (millefiori), milk glass, and imitation gemstones made of glass.” (Sayeth wikipedia.) Venetian glass is/was The Hot Shit." Thx for the comment tecmessa
Offrande du soir (private chapel-France), Henri Guerin, Plaisance du Touch, France, 2000. Published in New Glass Review 22 (via Offrande du soir (private chapel - France) | Corning Museum of Glass)